Eat mint and ‘Feel Good’

mintIn episode five of ‘Feel Good Food’, I talk about an ingredient that has a prominent and secure position in most people’s gardens and is used just as much in winter as it is in the warmer months of summer.

Did you know that mint is the most called upon herb for soothing a great deal of ailments from indigestion to heartburn and the common cold to bad breath?

Did you also know that mint’s menthol component can act as a revitalising air freshener and is extremely helpful in repelling mosquitoes; even ants and mice!

I highly recommend making the Thai Venison Salad in my book, From Paddock to Plate, using a big bunch of mint.

The Health Club is a monthly program on ABC digital radio, which uncovers health and fitness trends. Discover ways to improve your physical and mental health and learn some delicious and healthy recipes.

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TODAY’S HARVEST: Peanuts Do you know where peanuts come from? From a vine, from a bush, from a tree or from the ground? Perhaps the photo below will give you a hint. Unlike other nuts that grow on trees like almonds and cashews, peanuts are legumes. The peanut plant is unusual because it flowers above ground but the peanut grows below the ground. Peanuts need full sun. If you have heavy soil, ensure good drainage by working in enough organic matter to make it loose and friable. Peanut seeds come in their shells and can be planted hulled or unhulled. If you do shell them, don’t remove the thin, pinkish brown seed coverings, or the seed won’t germinate. One inch of water a week is plenty a peanut plant. Being legumes, peanuts supply their own nitrogen, so avoid nitrogen-rich fertilisers, which encourage foliage rather than fruits. The crop is ready to harvest when leaves turn yellow and the peanuts’ inner shells have gold-marked veins, which you can check periodically by pulling out..

11 hours ago

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