Recipes

Spatzle with wild mushrooms and truffle

The world’s largest white truffle found in Italy and weighing 1.89 kilograms sold at auction for more than $70,000 in 2014.

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Spatzle with wild mushrooms and truffle

Ingredients

Serves 2 -3

75g butter (into beurre noisette)
250g soft flour
2 eggs
1 yolk
125g milk
salt, pepper and nutmeg

Sift the flour into a bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the rest of the ingredients. Beat until you have smooth dough. Cover with cling wrap and allow to rest at room temperature for 1 hour. Boil a pot of lightly salted water then spread the spatzle mix onto a chopping board or tray. Scrape into the boiling water using a palette knife. Allow to boil for 2 minutes, then drain well and refresh in ice cold water. Add some olive oil to stop the noodles from sticking together. Sauté in foaming butter.

Mushroom sauce

200g assorted wild mushrooms (fresh if possible)
3 cloves garlic
fresh thyme
salt and black pepper
100 g fresh cream
½ lemon
fresh grated parmesan cheese
loads and loads of shaved black truffle

Recipe courtesy of Shane Osborn, head chef at St Betty in Hong Kong

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Potato Gnocchi

The humble potato has gotten a bad rap over the years, but it’s time we start giving nutritious spuds the respect they deserve with this tasty gnocchi recipe.

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Potato Gnocchi

Ingredients

4 large royal blue potatoes, peeled and quartered
1 egg, lightly whisked
1 – 1½ cups plain flour
Salt and pepper
¼ cup finely grated parmesan
Plain flour, to dust

Boil the potatoes until cooked. Drain really well and mash. Turn the potato onto a surface and leave to cool for a while. Whisk the egg and pour on top. Add the flour, seasoning and cheese. Combine gently. Once the mixture is combined put to the side. Clean down the bench; flour it and take small bits of the mixture at a time. Roll the gnocchi gently into long sausage shapes and cut into pieces.

Recipe courtesy of Sophie Budd, Taste Budds Cooking Studio

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Fig salad

The rolling Adelong hills in southern New South Wales are a long way from the Mediterranean, the native home of the fig. But tucked away in a deep valley you’ll find 4,000 fig trees, which make up the largest fig orchard in the Riverina.

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Fig salad

Ingredients

bunch of rocket leaves
ripe figs
goat’s cheese
cherry tomatoes (optional)
olive oil
mint leaves
lemon juice

Combine the washed rocket, figs and goat’s cheese on a platter. Add the tomatoes (if using). Pour over the olive oil and sprinkle with mint. Add a good squeeze of lemon.

Recipe courtesy of Marg Salmon

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Smoked salmon and avocado wraps

Whether you like to eat avocado the good old Aussie way with Vegemite, or prefer it with prawns and salmon over summer, it’s good to know the fruit has come straight from the tree. The special thing about an avocado is that it doesn’t mature until you harvest it. This recipe makes a delicious light lunch or enjoy as finger food with drinks.

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Smoked salmon and avocado wraps

Ingredients

100 grams smoked salmon, chopped
2 avocados, diced
2 cups baby spinach, sliced
½ red onion, finely chopped
1 bunch coriander, chopped
2 tbsp capers
cracked pepper
lime juice to moisten
roti bread or lettuce leaves

Mix all of the ingredients together in a bowl, except the roti bread. Warm the roti and cut into quarters. Place spoonfuls of avocado mixture into the pockets of bread, or wrap up and serve in the lettuce leaves.

Recipe courtesy of Shirley Ipsen

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Steamed ginger and soy crab

This recipe is courtesy of Brian Harland, from Alyangula on Groote Eylandt, the largest island in the Gulf of Carpentaria in northeastern Australia.

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Steamed ginger and soy crab

Ingredients

2 mud crabs
5 cm piece fresh ginger, finely grated
3 tbsp (50 ml) soy sauce
2 tsp sesame oil
rice wine, to taste

Place the crabs in the freezer until they go to sleep, approximately 15 to 20 minutes. This is the most humane method. Heat water in a good-sized wok and bring to the boil. Place a bamboo or metal steamer on top. Meanwhile, mix ginger, soy sauce, sesame oil and rice wine together in a small bowl. Remove the crabs from the freezer and crack the claws. Apply the mixture to the crab and allow it to soak in. Place the crab in the steamer for 15 to 20 minutes – longer if the crabs are large. Don’t pack the steamer too tightly or the crabs won’t cook thoroughly. Serve hot or cold and season with salt.

Recipe courtesy of Brian Harland

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Ringwould goat blanc & Manjimup truffles on toast with Torbay asparagus

Ringwould Dairy is a family business, located near Albany in Western Australia’s extraordinary South West region. Producing their products without chemicals and where possible by hand, Ringwould Dairy’s philosophy is to give their goats the best, so they produce the best milk and cheese.

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Ringwould goat blanc & Manjimup truffles on toast with Torbay asparagus

Ingredients

4 slices rustic bread
150 grams Ringwould goat blanc
8 Torbay asparagus spears
10 grams Manjimup black truffle
sea salt
pepper
1 garlic clove
extra virgin olive oil
organic grape syrup or vincotto

Beat the goat blanc in a mixer for 30 to 45 seconds to loosen and lighten. Grate in Manjimup truffle, stir well to combine and reserve. Peel the bases of the asparagus and trim off 1 centimetre. Boil the asparagus for 2 minutes in salted water, remove and season. Drizzle with olive oil and keep warm. Wipe the bread with the cut side of the garlic clove and brush with olive oil. Barbecue or toast until golden and place onto serving plates. Place asparagus on top, then a quenelle of the “truffled” goat blanc. Drizzle with olive oil and organic grape syrup.

Recipe courtesy of Chef/Owner of Must Winebar, Russell Blaikie
Produce supplied by Augusta Saunders from Ringwould Dairy, Redmond

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Slow-roast Arkady lamb leg with baharat & giant tabouli

Margaret River chef, Russell Blaikie, treated us to the tantalising recipe on the From Paddock to Plate stage at Gourmet Escape 2012. It was devoured in an instant!

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Slow-roast Arkady lamb leg with baharat & giant tabouli

Serves 4-6

Marinade for 1 bone in Arkady lamb leg

1 heaped tablespoon baharat
2 cloves garlic (crushed)
2 tablespoons chopped flat leaf parsley
finely grated zest of 2 lemons
60ml extra virgin olive oil
1 heaped tablespoon sea salt

Marinate the lamb the day before. Mix the marinade ingredients together in a large bowl. Place lamb leg in bowl and rub with marinade. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Heat oven to 200 degrees. Place lamb leg on rack above deep oven tray. Pour enough water into tray to cover the base. Cover lamb leg with foil and seal around the edges of the tray. Bake for 1 and 1/2 hours, and then reduce the oven temperature down to 110 degrees for another 4 hours. Check that the water has not boiled dry in the tray. Replenish it as necessary, keeping the foil tightly sealed. Check the lamb is tender. It should be falling off the bone. Increase oven temperature to 180 degrees and remove foil so that lamb browns and crisps for 20 minutes.

Serve with fresh bread and giant tabouli salad.

Ingredients for giant tabouli

1 cup pearl couscous
1 cup flat leaf parsley leaves
½ cup mint leaves
2 spring onions (sliced finely)
6-8 truss cherry tomatoes cut in half
¼ Lebanese cucumber (diced)

Dressing

1 teaspoon preserved lemon flesh (diced finely)
juice of ½ lemon
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon sea salt and a few twists freshly ground black pepper

Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Add couscous and cook for 10 minutes. Remove, cool and drain into colander under running water for 1 minute. Drain completely and place in a bowl. Mix together dressing ingredients and pour over the couscous. Allow to cool to room temperature. Add the rest of the salad ingredients and toss lightly.

Serve with Greek yoghurt or tzatziki and Turkish red pepper flakes (pul biber).

Recipe courtesy of Chef/Owner of Must Winebar, Russell Blaikie
Produce supplied by Matt Gilray, The Farm House in Margaret River & Witchcliffe organic pig and sheep farmer, David Hohen

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Baked Giddy Goat Chevre with pickled Manjimup rustleberries, crispy brik pastry and thyme brioche wafers

There’s only one property where you will find the unique rustleberry growing and that is in Manjimup. Kay Gravett says she would pick berries from the newfound bush, a cross between the old English raspberry and blackberry, and hear a rustle travelling from one side to another. As it turns out, the cause of the sound was a six-foot tiger snake living underneath the blackberry bush, which led to the name rustleberry.

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Baked Giddy Goat Chevre with pickled Manjimup rustleberries, crispy brik pastry and thyme brioche wafers

Pickled rustleberries

200g brown sugar
200ml red wine vinegar
1 tbsp of roasted and ground fennel seed

Place the vinegar and sugar in a pan and reduce by a third until thickens, and then add fennel seed. Set aside and keep warm.

Baked chevre cheese

Line tray with baking paper and place cheese on top. Gently warm the cheese in the oven (180 degrees) for 2-5 mins depending on the size and how soft you want the cheese.

Crisp brik pastry

Cut desired shape and place on a tray with baking paper. Brush with clarified butter and sprinkle with sea salt and roasted fennel seed. Bake in oven at (180 degrees) for 5-10mins until crisp.

Thyme brioche wafers

Slice a loaf of brioche very thinly. Place on baking tray lined with paper and brush with a thyme olive oil. Bake in oven (180 degrees) until golden brown for about 8-10 minutes.

Place rustleberries into the pickling caramel once it has cooled but still warm. (This is so you don’t cook the berries too much; you don’t want them to break down). Place cheese in the oven once the berries start to marinate.

To plate, place cheese on serving dish and top with berries and a drizzling of caramel. Top with a little sea salt and fennel seeds and add brik pastry and brioche wafers.

Serve with a glass of Peos Four Aces Shiraz 2007; 2009 Great Australian Shiraz Challenge Top 50

Recipe courtesy of The Oxford Hotel Head Chef, Gregg Burdon
Produce supplied by Manjimup orchardists, Kay and Phil Gravett

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Vanilla-whipped Ringwould quark with strawberries and mandarin oil

What is quark I hear you say? Quark is soft, fresh cheese, that has a similar creamy texture to sour cream and a mild tangy taste. Originating in Europe (the name essentially means “curd”), quark is a versatile creamy cheese, useful in everything from cake recipes to dips and low-fat spreads.

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Vanilla-whipped Ringwould quark with strawberries and mandarin oil

Ingredients

Serves 6-8

500 grams Ringwould quark
250ml cream
2 leaves gelatin (titanium)
1 vanilla bean
75 grams icing sugar

To garnish

1 punnet strawberries
shortbread biscuits (crushed)
mandarin oil

Beat the cream to light peaks and put in refrigerator while you prepare the other ingredients. Soak gelatin leaves in cold water for five minutes. Drain and squeeze excess water off. Place in a small saucepan and heat over low heat until melted, keep warm. Scrape the vanilla pod into the quark, add sifted icing sugar. Beat in a mixer for 30 seconds. Carefully fold whipped cream through beaten quark, then pour or spoon quark into serving dishes or glasses. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours. When ready to serve, hull strawberries and place on top of whipped quark, drizzle with a little mandarin oil and crumble over crushed shortbread.

Recipe courtesy of Chef/Owner of Must Winebar, Russell Blaikie
Produce supplied by Augusta Saunders from Ringwould Dairy, Redmond

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Nage vegetables with seared Esperance scallop

Nage is the term used in the USA for a flavoured liquid used for poaching delicate foods, typically seafood. A traditional nage is a broth flavoured with white wine, vegetables, and herbs, in which seafood is poached. The liquid is then reduced and thickened with cream and/or butter.

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Nage vegetables with seared Esperance scallop

Ingredients for nage

2 carrots
1 fennel bulb
2 leeks
2 shallots
2 garlic cloves
5 peppercorns
½ star anise
250ml white wine
2 litres water
½ onion
4 stalks of thyme
bay leaves

Choose the freshest in season vegetables to go with the nage stock!

Place all ingredients (chopped and washed) in a pot, bring to a boil then slowly simmer for 45 minutes. Strain through fine strainer. Get a pan big enough to hold your vegetables and a large ladle or two of Nage stock. Add the stock and vegetables and keep on high heat until the bubbles in the pan start getting bigger. Add 1 to 2 spoons of butter and reduce. Serve, dress with sauce and top with a seared scallop or two! Garnish with micro herbs and salmon caviar.

Recipe supplied by Cape Lodge Head Chef, Tony Howell
Produce supplied by Metricup vegetable growers, Jack & Maxine Mammone

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