Spatzle with wild mushrooms and truffle

Ingredients

Serves 2 -3

75g butter (into beurre noisette)
250g soft flour
2 eggs
1 yolk
125g milk
salt, pepper and nutmeg

Sift the flour into a bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the rest of the ingredients. Beat until you have smooth dough. Cover with cling wrap and allow to rest at room temperature for 1 hour. Boil a pot of lightly salted water then spread the spatzle mix onto a chopping board or tray. Scrape into the boiling water using a palette knife. Allow to boil for 2 minutes, then drain well and refresh in ice cold water. Add some olive oil to stop the noodles from sticking together. Sauté in foaming butter.

Mushroom sauce

200g assorted wild mushrooms (fresh if possible)
3 cloves garlic
fresh thyme
salt and black pepper
100 g fresh cream
½ lemon
fresh grated parmesan cheese
loads and loads of shaved black truffle

Recipe courtesy of Shane Osborn, head chef at St Betty in Hong Kong

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