Thai Venison Salad

Ingredients

500 grams venison strip loin
30ml peanut oil
100 grams spring onions, finely sliced
1 continental cucumber, finely sliced
1 carrot, finely chopped
½ bunch mint, finely chopped
½ bunch coriander, finely chopped
1 bunch basil, chopped
Chilli

Dressing

100ml balsamic vinegar
100 grams shaved palm sugar
15ml sesame oil
50ml soy sauce
6 Thai chillis
25 grams green ginger, grated
3 sticks lemon grass, soft inner part only
2 tbs lime juice

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees. Put tray and resting rack into oven. Roll the prepared venison through the peanut oil, quickly sear on all sides and put it on the rack in the oven. Cook for 25-30 minutes. Remove from the oven, cover with a cloth and allow to cool to room temperature. Slice the venison thinly. Meanwhile to make the dressing, place vinegar, sugar, oil and soy into the saucepan and stir over high heat until sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat. Add the remaining ingredients to the liquid. Chill until ready to serve. To assemble the salad, toss all of the salad ingredients together and then pour over half the dressing. Put half of the salad onto the plate, cover with the venison and scatter the remaining salad over the top. Drizzle the remaining dressing over the top and serve immediately.

Recipe courtesy of Margaret River venison producer Kylie Kennaugh

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TODAY’S HARVEST: Peanuts Do you know where peanuts come from? From a vine, from a bush, from a tree or from the ground? Perhaps the photo below will give you a hint. Unlike other nuts that grow on trees like almonds and cashews, peanuts are legumes. The peanut plant is unusual because it flowers above ground but the peanut grows below the ground. Peanuts need full sun. If you have heavy soil, ensure good drainage by working in enough organic matter to make it loose and friable. Peanut seeds come in their shells and can be planted hulled or unhulled. If you do shell them, don’t remove the thin, pinkish brown seed coverings, or the seed won’t germinate. One inch of water a week is plenty a peanut plant. Being legumes, peanuts supply their own nitrogen, so avoid nitrogen-rich fertilisers, which encourage foliage rather than fruits. The crop is ready to harvest when leaves turn yellow and the peanuts’ inner shells have gold-marked veins, which you can check periodically by pulling out..

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