SUPERFOOD SERIES: Breadfruit

Have you ever wondered what the inside of a breadfruit looks like?

This dimply bright green orb the size of a cantaloupe has always created interest and intrigue. Why now for a breadfruit comeback? It’s high in fibre, antioxidants, calcium, iron and potassium.

The other great news is that you can eat breadfruit at any stage. When it’s small and green, it tastes like an artichoke. When it’s starchy and mature, breadfruit is the equivalent of a potato. When it’s soft and ripe, it’s dessert.

A traditional staple in Hawaii, breadfruit is sometimes called the tree potato, for its potato-like consistency when cooked. Except breadfruit has higher-quality protein and packs a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals.

That’s why this nutrient-rich staple is being cultivated for poorer, tropical parts of the world, giving us even more reasons to consider breadfruit as a superfood. The fast-growing perennial trees require far less labour, fertiliser and pesticides than crops like rice and wheat. They’re also more productive. A single tree yields an average of 250 fruits a year and can bear an abundance of fruit for decades.

Breadfruit grows on tall trees in tropical areas like Hawaii, Samoa, and the Caribbean. It’s high in energy from carbohydrates, low in fat and has more potassium than 10 bananas.

This fruit is an immune booster and is rich in amino acids that are essential to keeping our bodies fueled and functioning properly. It’s loaded with bioflavonoids, which fight inflammation, and contains high levels of thiamine to support digestive health.

So the next time you see breadfruit on a menu, enjoy this superfood, knowing that it is providing your body with plenty of nourishment.

Click here for the RECIPE.

#feedyourmind

Louise FitzRoy | Founder & Director
From Paddock to Plate

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