Blog

Turning food waste into fertile soil 6th June, 2016

“Every year 1.3 billion tonnes of food are wasted around the world. This would be enough to feed over three billion people (almost half the world). Only one kilogram of food waste could help to grow between 10-20 kilograms of fresh food by feeding the soil instead of feeding landfills. Until we don’t remember how to appreciate the origin of our food (the soil), our attempts to solve the many social, environmental and economic problems we have will be like trying to hit a Mexican piñata blindfolded,” says Rodrigo Castellanos, Director at ZEA Hungry Goods.

Food is the challenge of our time 31st May, 2016

Did someone say food education? Introducing the From Paddock to Plate food schools program as a food education resource that is educating people about the importance of food, food sustainability and food security so that we can continue to feed a growing global population.

Classy Clare 16th May, 2016

I must go now to harvest the trees in the Sevenhill Cellars’ orchard laden with ripe oranges and figs. A place where, in the heart of the Clare Valley, learning where your food comes from is inevitable and food education is unavoidable. The sun is setting and it’s time to put the chooks to bed. Who knows what tomorrow will bring. One thing is for certain. Fresh eggs for breakfast!

What did you eat for breakfast? 9th May, 2016

Do you care? What would your reaction be if there were no bananas, eggs, tomatoes, milk or even oats to make your breakfast? Don’t laugh. This could happen. And it’s more likely to happen if we don’t support the farmers who produce the food that we eat everyday. Imagine Instagram without people posting photos of their breakfast…some would argue it would never be the same!

Narrabri marks its stake on Australia’s food map 2nd May, 2016

In amongst the monster trucks and wheelbarrow races, fairy floss and fireworks, stands the From Paddock to Plate (FP2P) marquee. This is where farmers come to share their stories, people gather to learn about where food comes from and chefs cook healthy delicious tastings.

Eating locally in Guatemala 25th April, 2016

A smokey haze blankets the Guatemalan mountains as we wind our way to Quetzaltenango (a three and-a-half hour trip west of Guatemala City), competing with the “wild” chicken buses for space on the road. As the vibrant red sun sets, we’re told that farmers are burning their sugar cane stubble in preparation for the wet season.

Empowering children with food education in Los Angeles 24th April, 2016

Imagine creating a nutritious and garden-inspired menu item for a well-known restaurant owned by a celebrity chef! This is exactly the opportunity that students in Los Angeles have thanks to the tremendous work of nonprofit organisation, GrowingGreat, which has now reached out to more than 250,000 children, teens and families across California.

Reducing food miles in California 23rd April, 2016

On average food travels 1500 miles (2,500 kilometres) ‘from paddock to plate’ in the USA. However for at least 20 families, half an hour drive north of San Diego, it doesn’t. Tucked away in suburbia Encinitas, I was impressed by Coral Tree Farm. I’m not sure whether it was the vibrant native flame flowers, the heritage breed chickens scratching in the dirt or the fruiting mulberry tree that first caught my attention.

Making mezcal in Mexico 20th April, 2016

It’s hot, sticky and I have a trickle of sweat running down my back. The answer? A drink of mezcal of course. Central Americans not only invented chocolate but can also claim mezcal – the drink sometimes called tequila’s father – as their own. In the Oaxaca countryside, mezcal flows like water, agave plants scatter the land and mezcal-flavoured ice cream is more common than vanilla.

Still riding on the sheep’s back in Mexico 16th April, 2016

Australian wool shows up where you least expect it. As a country girl growing up on a fine merino wool property in the New England region of New South Wales, I was excited to find a master weaver in a rural area in southern Mexico using Aussie wool! “We use 60 per cent Australian wool and 40 per cent local wool to make our rugs,” says Oaxaca craftsman Nelson Perez.